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Chicago – Live In Tronto 1969 [Teichiku Records, TECX-25272, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: Live In Tronto 1969
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS

Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 01/08/2014

Tracklisting

1. Introduction – 6:42
2. South California Purples – 5:52
3. 25 Or 6 To 4 – 5:15
4. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? – 3:12
5. I’m A Man – 7:10
6. Questions 67 And 68 – 4:54
7. LIberation – 16:14

Although it may be difficult to believe now, in the late Sixties and early Seventies Chicago were something of a phenomenon. Their debut LP. b’Chicago Transit Authority’, was certified platinum in the US, something no other CBS artist had ever achieved, even though the label boasted such names as Bob Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel. Their second, simply titled ‘Chicago’, repeated the commercial success of their first, and singles from both sold strongly either side of the Atlantic.

As time passed, their music mellowed and interest waned, the critical acclaim turned to critical reviews, and although Chicago continued to record right through the Seventies and Eighties, they have never recaptured the excitement generated by those early releases. All but one of the band’s original line-up hailed from the city which gave them their name. Their early days were spent largely unnoticed in the dingy bars and clubs of the Midwest, but a move to the West coast in 1968 proved crucial to their later success.

Here they linked up with James William Guercio, who had established his credentials through production work with Blood, Sweat and Tears. Guercio not only secured the band dates at prestigious West coast venues, he also negotiated their recording contract with CBS. The volatile political scene of the late Sixties provided the other key element of their success. During 1968, protests at America’s involvement in Vietnam were at their height, and racial tension was at fever pitch.

Demonstrations outside the Democratic Convention in Chicago turned into full scale riots when police used tear-gas and clubs to disperse the crowds. Recordings of protesters were incorporated into one of the numbers on Chicago’s debut LP. and this move, coupled with lyrics informed by the revolutionary rhetoric of the times, completed their identification with both their home town and the counter-culture. Their music had an exciting, innovative feel, and was probably the most successful attempt ever to marry the diverse elements of jazz, rock and white soul.

Its precise brass arrangements blended with lengthy jazz guitar solos appealed to a late Sixties audience constantly searching for a more sophisticated sound. This recording of an early live performance at one of the famed Toronto Rock Festivals provides evidence of the band’s ability and power.

On stage, although they obviously sought to reproduce the often complex arrangements arrived at the studio, they were never afraid to cut loose and explore the possibilities of the’jazzier side of their music. Faithful renditions of their hit singles ’25 Or 6 To 4′, ‘Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? and the Steve Winwood penned ‘I’m A Man’ contrast with the looser improvisational approach employed on ‘Liberation’, the number which closes the set.

The shifting textures of this lengthy instrumental are epitomised by Terry Kath’s exhilarating guitar – a key component of Chicago’s characteristic sound and one sadly lost forever with his death in a firearms accident in 1978. Anyone with a taste for Chicago’s early work will welcome this opportunity to hear the band run through these blistering versions of their best-loved numbers. Their unqiue blend of widely differing musical styles set apart from almost everyone around them – in their own distinctive way, Chicago were themselves a minor revolution.

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Chicago – If You Leave Me Now (1983) [Teichiku Records, TECW-2021] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: If You Leave Me Now
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS

Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 20/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. If You Leave Me Now – 3:59
2. Saturday In The Park – 3:57
3. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday – 4:16
4. (I’ve Been) Searchin’ So Long – 4:32
5. 25 Or 6 To 4 – 4:54
6. Baby, What A Big Surprise – 3:07
7. Wishing You Were Here – 4:37
8. No Tell Lover – 3:54
9. Another Rainy Day In New York City – 3:04
10. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? – 2:56
11. Song For You – 3:41

This is how the music business works: you drop an act that was once successful and has hit the skids. Then the act has a comeback with another company. What do you do? Release a compilation of previously released tracks that are still available on various other albums. At least a few people will mistake it for new product and take it home.

by William Ruhlmann, AMG

It’s easy to see why someone who was in junior high in the 70′s would love this CD. I certainly did. Each song takes you back to a time when life was definitely less hectic and, for this 40-something, much more romantic. Starting with “Saturday in the Park” from 1972, and with songs that were played constantly through 1979, Chicago has put together a greatest hits album which appears to be aimed specifically at those who graduated from high school some 20 or so years ago. How many of us heard “25 or 6 to 4″ played by our high school bands at ballgames? That has to bring back some pretty great memories! With “If you Leave me now,” “Wishing you were here,” and “I’ve Been Searching” used to cover the sentimental loves of our youths, Chicago gives us a chance to reacapture that innocent love of life, and with “Song for You” as the last song on the CD, gives us some hope that there is still that lasting love out there somewhere. This is a great CD that continually plays at my home….in my car….at the office.

By A Customer, amazon

I’ve always enjoyed Chicago’s lush sound with the horns and vocals. This album really covers a lot of what makes the band so great. From the title ballad, which really touches you even after many years, you move on to “Saturday in the Park” which really captures that carefree mood.

“Feelin’ Stronger Everyday” is not only a feel-good dancy song but has one of the best ending sequences of any song I’ve heard. Then of course there is the super-classic “25 or 6 to 4″ which surely every classic song singer knows by heart

“Baby, what a big surprise” is another classic that gets your heart going. There’s something about truly each song here on this album. You can leave the CD in your stereo and play it each day, and find something in there to enjoy.

How can you even compare to the horns of “Does anybody really know what time it is” – never mind the lyrics, which get you thinking …

True classic work.

By Lisa Shea, amazon

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Chicago – Chicago X (1976) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1912, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: X
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 29/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Once Or Twice – 3:04
2. Your Are On My Mind – 3:22
3. Skin Tight – 3:21
4. If You Leave Me Now – 3:58
5. Together Again – 3:53
6. Another Rainy Day In New York City – 3:04
7. Mama Mama – 3:33
8. Scrapbook – 3:32
9. Gently I’ll Wake You – 3:36
10. You Get It Up – 3:38
11. Hope For Love – 3:03

Although it was their tenth release Chicago X (1976) was actually the band’s eighth studio effort — as Chicago IV (1972) had been a live set from Carnegie Hall and Chicago IX (1975), which precedes this disc, was their first best-of collection. Musically, the combo had effectively abandoned their extended free-form jazz leanings for more succinct pop songs. That is not to say that the band couldn’t rock, because they could as evidenced by the Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) full-tilt rave-up “Once or Twice,” which commences the album. The hot brass section bows deeply and respectfully to their Muscle Shoals counterparts as Kath does his best funky Otis Redding vocal. Showing his tremendous depth of field, Kath bookends the LP with the empowering and positive “Hope for Love.” In between those two extremes are some of Chicago’s best-known works — such as Peter Cetera’s (bass/vocals) chart-topping light rock epic “If You Leave Me Now” and Robert Lamm’s (keyboards/vocals) “Another Rainy Night in New York City.” The latter side also reveals a minor motif, as it is a Latin-based song about the Big Apple. It follows in the footsteps of the improv-heavy “Italian from New York” from their previous studio effort, the fusion-filled Chicago VII (1974). Lamm contributes a few other tucked-away classics to Chicago X as well — such as the aggressive and sexy “You Get It Up.” There are also a pair from James Pankow(trombone/vocals) in the form of the syncopated “You Are on My Mind” — which crossed over onto both the adult contemporary as well as pop music charts. His other composition is the classy brass of “Skin Tight.” The upfront horn interjections and overall augmentation are akin to the sound made famous by their West Coast Tower of Power contemporaries. As a majority of their previous efforts had done — all sans their debut — Chicago X was a Top Ten album and “If You Leave Me Now” became a double Grammy winner, for both Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo Group or Chorus and Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s). The latter award was actually not given to the band, but rather to noted string arranger Jimmie Haskell and the group’s longtime producer, James William Guercio. Another well-deserved Grammy was given to John Berg for his visually enticing cover art — depicting Chicago’s logo on the wrapper of what otherwise appears to be a Hershey chocolate bar. As the disc was released in the summer of the U.S. bicentennial (1976), the all-American image was undoubtedly and duly noted.

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Chicago – Chicago VIII (1975) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1910, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: VIII
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 20/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Anyway You Want – 3:40
2. Brand New Love Affair – Pt I & II – 4:31
3. Never Been In Love Before – 4:12
4. Hideaway – 4:46
5. Till We Meet Again – 2:05
6. Harry Truman – 3:04
7. Oh, Thank You Great Spirit – 7:20
8. Long Time No See – 2:49
9. Ain’t It Blue? – 3:31
10. Old Days – 3:32

Road-weary and running low on steam, the members of Chicago began tinkering with their formula on the nostalgic Chicago VIII. Robert Lamm continued to loosen his grip on the songwriting, allowing Peter Cetera, Terry Kath, and James Pankow to pen the majority of the album. The enthusiasm and drive that the band had displayed on their previous efforts was audibly escaping them, best exemplified by the lazy drawl that Cetera affects on his otherwise rocking “Anyway You Want.” Finally, the jazz tinges continued to appear less and less, replaced by a brassy R&B approach that provides a more rigid structure for their tunes. But these factors don’t necessarily count against the band, as many songs have a lazy, late-afternoon feel that provides a few feel-good moments. Pankow’s “Brand New Love Affair — Part I & II” is a smooth, light rock ballad that Terry Kath wraps his soulful voice around, transforming it into a brooding lament on lost love. This track also begins to incorporate the multi-vocalist approach that would become the trademark of their ’80s work, as the second half of the song is sung by Cetera and Lamm as well. Kath’s “Oh, Thank You Great Spirit” is another winner, as his delicate vocals drift along on a sparse and psychedelic (for Chicago at least) sea of guitars. Pankow’s “Old Days” may be the only other notable track, a powerful rocker that showcases his tight compositional skills and provided the band with the only memorable hit song from the record. Lamm’s contributions are the least-commercial songs, as his arty and dynamic tracks are nostalgic entries that show him moving in an atypical direction lyrically and musically. Only his “Harry Truman” really connects, and the instrumental tributes to Depression-era jazz and the goofy singalong ending manage to render the song silly before it can really sink in. Although not terrible by any means, Chicago VIII is heavily burdened by their obvious desire to take a break. The band hits upon some wonderful ideas here, but they are simply too weary to follow them up, and the resulting album has none of the tight orchestration that reigns in their more ridiculous tendencies.

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Chicago – Chicago VII (1974) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1909, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: VII
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 20/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Prelude To Aire – 2:46
2. Aire – 6:31
3. Devil’s Sweet – 10:03
4. Italian From New York – 4:14
5. Hanky Panky – 1:53
6. Life Saver – 5:19
7. Happy Man – 3:33
8. I’ve Been Searching So Long – 4:28
9. Mongonuleosis – 3:29
10. Song Of The Evergreens – 5:23
11. Byblos – 6:19
12. Wishing You Were Here – 4:36
13. Call On Me – 4:03
14. Woman Don’t Want To Love – 4:37
15. Skinny Boy – 5:11

Although commercially successful, Chicago’s previous long-player, Chicago VI (1973), had not been received as warmly from both the critics as well as from some bandmembers. Both parties expressed their dissatisfaction with the lighter fare and significantly shorter material. In response, the combo briefly returned to their previously tried and true methodology on their follow-up album. As such, Chicago VII (1974) was not only a double LP, but much of the effort likewise returned them to their former jazz/rock glory while continuing the middle-of-the-road (MOR) ethos that was concurrently impacting the pop charts. Nowhere is this more evident than the trio of sides extracted as singles — including the Top Ten hits “(I’ve Been) Searching So Long,” “Call on Me,” and “Wishing You Were Here.” The latter of which features some stunning backing vocals from Beach Boys Dennis Wilson, Carl Wilson, and Alan Jardine. The group were continuing in their incorporation of additional musicians, most notably Laudir DeOliveira (percussion) and David J. Wolinski (ARP synthesizer) — both of whom are prominently featured throughout the sides. The opening instrumentals, including “Prelude to Aire,” “Aire,” and “Devil’s Sweet,” reflect Daniel Seraphine’s (drums) tremendously underrated skills as a writer as well as the combo’s recently underutilized talents as ensemble musicians. All three tracks provide a brilliant showcase for the brass/woodwind section(s) to flex their respective muscles, drawing heavily upon the styles of Weather Report and to some extent Miles Davis and Santana. The nature of their seemingly experimental fusion is stretched out even further on “Italian From New York.” The cut includes some interesting ARP interjections from Robert Lamm, whose decidedly free-form contributions weave alongside some rubbery and liquefied fretwork courtesy of Terry Kath (guitar/vocals). His lead bobs around Lamm’s synthesizer and an equally prominent cool-toned Fender Rhodes keyboard bed. The second half of Chicago VII directly contrasts the less structured instrumentals with more inclusive sides such as the previously mentioned hits “Call On Me” and “Wishing You Were Here.” Other highlights include Lamm’s funky mid-tempo “Life Saver,” Peter Cetera’s (bass/vocals) laid-back and unencumbered “Happy Man,” and a double shot from Kath in the form of two serene ballads, “Song of the Evergreens” and “Byblos” — which features some stellar acoustic strumming. This collection would be Chicago’s final two-disc set by the original lineup and offers the best of the band as improvisational instrumentalists as well as concise, emotive vocalists and song crafters.

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Chicago – Chicago VI (1973) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1908] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: Chicago VI
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS

Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 20/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Critics’ Choice – 2:48
2. Just You ‘N’ Me – 3:44
3. Darlin’ Dear – 2:58
4. Jenny – 3:33
5. What’s This World Comin’ To – 5:01
6. Something In This City Changes People – 3:42
7. Hollywood – 3:55
8. In Terms Of Two – 3:30
9. Rediscovery – 4:50
10. Feelin’ Stronger Every Day – 4:14

This is the sixth album from the jazz/pop/rock combo Chicago, and was likewise the first to be recorded at the plush, well-lit, and custom-built Caribou Studios in Nederland, CO. The facility was owned and operated by the band’s manager and producer, James William Guercio, and eventually became the group’s retreat for their next five (non-compilation) long-players. Another and perhaps more significant change was the incorporation of several “outside” additional musicians — most notably Laudir De Oliveira (percussion), who would remain with the band for the next seven years and eight LPs. Although Chicago had begun as a harder-edged rock & roll band, popular music styles were undergoing a shift during the mid-’70s into a decidedly more middle-of-the-road (MOR) and less-aggressive sound. This is reflected in the succinct pop and light rock efforts, contrasting the earlier lengthy and multi-movement epics that filled their earlier works. Nowhere is this more evident than on Chicago VI’s (1973) two Top Ten singles: the easygoing James Pankow (trombone) ballad “Just You & Me” as well as the up-tempo rocker “Feelin’ Stronger Every Day,” which Pankow co-wrote with Peter Cetera (vocal/bass). This more melodic and introverted sensibility pervades the rest of the disc as well — especially from Robert Lamm (keyboard/vocals), who is particularly prolific, penning half of the material on the disc. Even his sardonically titled “Critics’ Choice” — which is undoubtedly a musical rebuttal to Chicago’s increasingly negative critical assessment — is a languid and delicate response, rather than a full-force confutation. “Darlin’ Dear” — another Lamm contribution — on the other hand, is a horn-fuelled rocker that actually recalls Little Feat more than it does most of Chicago’s previous sides. Compositions from other bandmembers include the heartfelt Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) ballad “Jenny,” which features some fluid fretwork much in the same vein as that of Jimi Hendrix’s “Angel” or “Castles Made of Sand.” Additionally, Peter Cetera’s (bass/vocals) “In Terms of Two” includes a more down-home and countrified acoustic vibe. While Chicago VI is an undeniably strong effort — supported at the time by its chart-topping status — many bandmembers and longtime enthusiasts were beginning to grow apart from the lighter, pop-oriented material.

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Chicago – Chicago V (1972) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1907] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: Chicago V
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 59 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Tags……………..: VorbisComment
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS

Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 17/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. A Hit By Varese – 4:51
2. All Is Well – 3:42
3. Now That You’ve Gone – 4:58
4. Dialog, Pt. 1 – 2:57
5. Dialog, Pt. 2 – 4:16
6. While the City Sleeps – 3:46
7. Saturday in the Park – 3:54
8. State of the Union – 5:52
9. Goodbye – 5:49
10. Alma Mater – 3:47

With four gold multi-disc LPs and twice as many hit singles to its credit, Chicago issued its fifth effort, the first to clock in at under an hour. What they lack in quantity, they more than make up for in the wide range of quality of material. The disc erupts with the progressive free-form “A Hit by Varese” — which seems to have been inspired as much by Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s Tarkus (1971) or Yes circa Close to the Edge (1972) as by the Parisian composer for whom it is named. Fully 80 percent of the material on Chicago V (1972) is also a spotlight for the prolific songwriting of Robert Lamm (keyboards/vocals). In addition to penning the opening rocker, he is also responsible for the easy and airy “All Is Well,” which is particularly notable for its lush Beach Boys-esque harmonies. However, Lamm’s most memorable contributions are undoubtedly the Top Ten sunshine power pop anthem “Saturday in the Park” and the equally upbeat and buoyant “Dialogue, Pt. 1″ and “Dialogue, Pt. 2.” Those more accessible tracks are contrasted by James Pankow’s (trombone/percussion) aggressive jazz fusion “Now That You’ve Gone.” Although somewhat dark and brooding, it recalls the bittersweet “So Much to Say, So Much to Give” and “Anxiety’s Moment” movements of “Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon” found on Chicago II.

Terry Kath’s (guitar/vocals) heartfelt ballad “Alma Mater” seems to be influenced by a Randy Newman sensibility. Lyrically, it could be interpreted as an open letter to his generation; lines such as “Looking back a few short years/When we made our plans and played the cards/The way they fell/Clinging to our confidence/We stood on the threshold of the goal/That we knew, dear” effectively recall the monumental world events that had taken place during the late ’60s and early ’70s. Likewise, there is an undeniable one-on-one intimated in the verse “And though we had our fights/Had our short tempered nights/It couldn’t pull our dreams apart/All our needs and all our wants/Drawn together in our heart/We felt it from the very start.” This is a fitting way to conclude the album, if not the entire troubled era.

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Chicago – Chicago Transit Authority (1969) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1901, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Renaissance
Album…………….: Chicago Transit Authority
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 59 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Tags……………..: VorbisComment
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 17/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Introduction – 6:34
2. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? – 4:34
3. Beginnings – 7:51
4. Questions 67 & 68 – 4:58
5. Listen – 3:20
6. Poem 58 – 8:37
7. Free Form Guitar – 6:49
8. South California Purples – 6:11
9. I’m a Man – 7:43
10. Prologue, August 29, 1968 – 0:57
11. Someday (August 29, 1968) – 4:35
12. Liberation – 14:17

Few debut albums can boast as consistently solid an effort as the self-titled Chicago Transit Authority (1969). Even fewer can claim to have enough material to fill out a double-disc affair. Although this long- player was ultimately the septet’s first national exposure, the group was far from the proverbial “overnight sensation.” Under the guise of the Big Thing, the group soon to be known as CTA had been honing its eclectic blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock & roll in and around the Windy City for several years. Their initial non-musical meeting occurred during a mid-February 1967 confab between the original combo at Walter Parazaider’s apartment on the north side of Chi Town. Over a year later, Columbia Records staff producer James Guercio became a key supporter of the group, which he rechristened Chicago Transit Authority. In fairly short order the band relocated to the West Coast and began woodshedding the material that would comprise this title. In April of 1969, the dozen sides of Chicago Transit Authority unleashed a formidable and ultimately American musical experience. This included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar wailin’ rock & roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. This approach economized the finest of what the band had to offer — actually two highly stylized units that coexisted with remarkable singularity. On the one hand, listeners were presented with an incendiary rock & roll quartet of Terry Kath (lead guitar/vocals), Robert Lamm (keyboards/vocals), Peter Cetera (bass/vocals), and Danny Seraphine (drums). They were augmented by the equally aggressive power brass trio that included Lee Loughnane (trumpet/vocals), James Pankow (trombone), and the aforementioned Parazaider (woodwind/vocals). This fusion of rock with jazz would also yield some memorable pop sides and enthusiasts’ favorites as well. Most notably, a quarter of the material on the double album — “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?,” “Beginnings,” “Questions 67 and 68,” and the only cover on the project, Steve Winwood’s “I’m a Man” — also scored as respective entries on the singles chart. The tight, infectious, and decidedly pop arrangements contrast with the piledriving blues-based rock of “Introduction” and “South California Purples” as well as the 15-plus minute extemporaneous free for all “Liberation.” Even farther left of center are the experimental avant-garde “Free Form Guitar” and the politically intoned and emotive “Prologue, August 29, 1968″ and “Someday (August 29, 1968).”

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Chicago – Chicago III (1971) [Teichiku Records, TECW-1903, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: Chicago III
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 13/07/2014

Tracklisting

1. Sing A Mean Tune Kid – 9:17
2. Loneliness Is Just A Word – 2:38
3. What Else Can I Say – 3:13
4. I Don’t Want Your Money – 4:47

Travel Suite:
5. Flight 602 – 2:44
6. Motorboat To Mars – 1:29
7. Free – 2:15
8. Free Country – 5:46
9. At The Sunrise – 2:48
10. Happy ‘Cause I’m Going Home – 7:28
11. Mother – 4:31
12. Lowdown – 3:36

An Hour In The Shower:
13. A Hard Risin’ Morning Without Breakfast – 1:52
14. Off To Work – 0:45
15. Fallin’ Out – 0:53
16. Dreamin’ Home – 0:49
17. Morning Blues Again – 1:11
18. When All The Laughter Dies In Sorrow – 1:03
19. Canon – 1:05
20. Once Upon A Time… – 2:34
21. Progress? – 2:34
22. The Approaching Storm – 6:26
23. Man Vs. Man: The End – 1:34

Chicago’s third effort, much like the preceding two, was initially issued as a double LP, and is packed with a combination of extended jams as well as progressive and equally challenging pop songs. Their innovative sound was the result of augmenting the powerful rock & roll quartet with a three-piece brass section — the members of whom are all consummate soloists. Once again, the group couples that with material worthy of its formidable skills. In the wake of the band’s earlier powerhouse successes, Chicago III has perhaps been unrightfully overshadowed. The bulk of the release consists of three multi-movement works: Robert Lamm’s (keyboards/vocals) “Travel Suite,” Terry Kath’s (guitar/vocals) “An Hour in the Shower,” and James Pankow’s (trombone) ambitious and classically influenced “Elegy.” While the long-player failed to produce any Top Ten hits, both Lamm’s rocker “Free” — extracted from “Travel Suite” — as well as the infectious “Lowdown” respectively charted within the Top 40. “Sing a Mean Tune Kid” opens the album with a nine-plus minute jam highlighting the impressive wah-wah-driven fretwork from Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) and some decidedly rousing syncopated punctuation from the horns. Lamm’s highly underrated jazzy keyboard contributions are notable throughout the tune as he maneuvers Peter Cetera’s (bass/vocals) bouncy basslines and the equally limber percussion of Danny Seraphine (drums). “What Else Can I Say” reveals much more of the band’s fusion beyond that of strictly pop/rock. The supple and liberated waltz bops around the playful melody line and is further bolstered by one of the LP’s most elegant brass arrangements as well as some equally opulent backing vocal harmonies. “I Don’t Want Your Money” is a hard-hittin’ Kath/Lamm rocker that packs a bluesy wallop lying somewhere between Canned Heat and the Electric Flag. Again, Kath’s remarkably funkified and sweet-toned electric guitar work hammers the track home.
Although “Travel Suite” is primarily a Lamm composition, both Seraphine’s “Motorboat to Mars” drum solo and the acoustic experimental “Free Country” balance out the relatively straightforward movements. These include the aggressive “Free” and the decidedly more laid-back “At the Sunrise” and “Happy ‘Cause I’m Going Home.” Kath’s “An Hour in the Shower” reveals the guitarist’s under-utilized melodic sense and craftsmanship. His husky lead vocals perfectly complement the engaging arrangements, which blend his formidable electric axe-wielding with some equally tasty acoustic rhythm licks. In much the same way that the Beatles did on the B-side medley from Abbey Road (1969), Chicago reveals its rare and inimitable vocal blend during the short “Dreaming Home” bridge. Chicago III concludes with Pankow’s six-part magnum opus, “Elegy.” Its beautiful complexity incorporates many of the same emotive elements as his “Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon” from their previous long-player. The ironically cacophonous and tongue-in-cheek “Progress” contains both comedic relief as well as an underlying social statement in the same vein as “Prologue, August 29, 1968″ from Chicago Transit Authority (1969). The final two movements — “The Approaching Storm” and “Man vs. Man: The End” — are among the most involved, challenging, and definitive statements of jazz-rock fusion on the band’s final double-disc studio effort. As pop music morphed into the mindless decadence that was the mid-’70s, Chicago abandoned its ambitiously arranged multifaceted epics, concentrating on more concise songcrafting.

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Chicago – Chicago At Carnegie Hall (1971) [3CD, Teichiku Records, TECW-4704~06, 2014] [FLAC]

Artist……………: Chicago
Album…………….: Chicago At Carnegie Hall 1971
Genre…………….: Rock
Source……………: CD
Year……………..: 2014
Ripper……………: EAC (Secure mode) / LAME 3.92 & Asus CD-S520
Codec…………….: Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC)
Version…………..: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
Quality…………..: Lossless, (avg. compression: 60 %)
Channels………….: Stereo / 44100 HZ / 16 Bit
Information……….: CD IMAGE – LOG – CUE – SCANS
Posted by…………: Beolab1700 on 13/07/2014

Tracklisting

Tracklist CD1:
1. In The Country – 10:35
2. Fancy Colours – 5:15
3. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is (Free Form Intro) – 6:20
4. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? – 3:26
5. South California Purples – 15:34
6. Questions 67 and 68 – 5:35
7. Sing A Mean Tune Kid – 12:53
8. Beginnings – 6:27

Tracklist CD2:
1. It Better End Soon – 1st Movement – 2:54
2. It Better End Soon – 2nd Movement (Flute Solo) – 5:00
3. It Better End Soon – 3rd Movement (Guitar Solo) – 2:42
4. It Better End Soon – 4th Movement (Preach) – 3:09
5. It Better End Soon – 5th Movement – 2:09
6. Introduction – 7:10
7. Mother – 8:20
8. Lowdown – 3:58
9. Flight 602 – 3:33
10. Motorboat To Mars – 2:59
11. Free – 5:15
12. Where Do We Go From Here – 4:08
13. I Don’t Want Your Money – 5:24

Tracklist CD3:
1. Happy ‘Cause I’m Going Home – 7:57
2. Make Me Smile – 3:30
3. So Much To Say, So Much To Give – 0:59
4. Anxiety’s Moment – 1:08
5. West Virginia Fantasies – 1:30
6. Colour My World – 3:26
7. To Be Free – 1:21
8. Now More Than Ever – 3:25
9. A Song For Richard And His Friends – 6:58
10. 25 Or 6 To 4 – 6:34
11. I’m A Man – 8:52

Chicago ranks among the all-time most successful groups in American rock. When it was first released as a four-LP package in 1972, this marathon live recording hit #3 on Billboard’s Pop album chart and was certified RIAA gold. Following up their 1969 debut album, Chicago Transit Authority, 1970′s Chicago II, and 1971′s Chicago III-#17, #4, and #2 respectively-this historic set features all their early hits and spotlights Chicago at the pinnacle of their inital success…

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